Koala Research
Home of the Koala Ecology Group
The University of Queensland
St Lucia, Australia 4072

Koala Ecology Group

Koala Ecology Group
 
Here at the Koala Ecology Group (KEG), we have been conducting koala research for some 30 years. We conduct field, captive and laboratory-based koala research projects, investigating the physiology and behavior of koalas in a range of research environments across Queensland. We have several current field koala research sites that have been continuously monitored for over 20 years, allowing us to undertake long term studies – such as the impacts of large infrastructure and resource extraction projects on the life history of free-ranging koalas, and seasonal spatial and breeding dynamics.

Our group pioneered new techniques for investigating mating systems, determining diet preferences, understanding vocal interactions and analyzing spatial dynamics, amongst other aspects of koala biology.

Our Director, Dr. Bill Ellis, graduated with a PhD in koala biology from the Department of Zoology at The University of Queensland and undertook a Postdoctoral Fellowship with the Centre for Research into Endangered Species at San Diego Zoo, prior to establishing the Koala Ecology Group. He is surrounded by a staff of dedicated biologists and ecologists and a team of enthusiastic and talented postgraduate students.

We are currently funded through a combination of Queensland Government, Non-Government Organisation and Industry funding, allowing us to research disease transmission, heat physiology, social behavior and responses to development and resource extraction. We have a number of community – based projects and have collaborative research projects with The University of Sydney, Queensland University of Technology and Central Queensland University.

We are fourtunate to undertake koala research at some incredible locations. Our main koala research sites include St Bees Island, Mt Byron and multiple sites in central Queensland, where we work closely with land owners who have koalas on their propoerties.

Koalas occur across a wide area of Queensland, but they are in trouble in many locations in QLD and NSW. With the help of caring landowners we are working to make sure they stay a part of our natural environment.

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    Koalas and climate change
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    Central Queensland Projects
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    Central Queensland Islands
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    Research Opportunities
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    Teamwork
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    Catching koalas
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    San Diego Zoo
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    Inland Research
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    Description
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    Description
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    Volunteers